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1968-1970 Dodge Charger Buyer’s Guide

The 1968-1970 Dodge Charger is considered by many Mopar aficionados to be the Charger’s most popular model years. These three years mark the second generation of this classic B-body hardtop. The fastback styling from previous years is axed and is replaced with a sleeker “coke bottle” shape.

The 1968-1970 Charger’s star power has certainly soared over the last 40 years. Steve McQueen chased one through the streets of San Francisco in the drive-in movie classic Bullitt. And who can forget Friday nights watching Bo and Luke Duke outrun Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane countless times on the television show The Dukes of Hazzard?

There are several things to consider when buying a 1968-1970 Dodge Charger. For starters, prices for the 383 and 440equipped models will certainly be more attainable than the lofty figures the Hemi cars command. Now that you’ve started searching for the Charger you’ve always wanted, where do you go from here? What price should you pay and what concerns should you have? Don’t worry because we’ve done some advanced research to help you find the Charger that’s perfect for you.

Year Specific Updates

1968: The Charger is all-new and available in Base and R/T trims. The Charger features a grille with concealed headlights, round tail lamps, and quick-fill gas cap.

1969: The Charger receives a new grille divider and restyled tail lamps. The SE, Charger 500 and Daytona are introduced this year.

1970: More styling changes include a new chrome loop bumper and rear-facing door scallops on the R/T. The 440 Six Pack engine is now available for the R/T.

1968 Dodge Charger #1

1968 Model Year

The 1968 Dodge Charger featured a complete redesign from the previous model year. The stretched fastback from last year gave way to a Charger that featured more aggressive “coke-bottle” styling with C-pillar sail panels and a wide, deep grille. The Charger was available in Base and R/T trims. Initially, the 318 V8 was the standard engine in Base models but was replaced mid-year with the 225 cubic-inch six cylinder. The R/T received a robust 440 Magnum V8 as standard equipment. A mere 475 R/T’s left the factory with the optional 426 Hemi engine. Standard equipment on the Base model included all-vinyl bucket seats, electric clock, and self-adjusting brakes. The R/T had standard features such as heavy duty brakes, F70x14 Red Streak tires, and bumblebee racing stripes. Sales of the new Charger soared with just over 96,000 sold.

Models: Base, R/T

Engines:

Type Cubic Inches Carburetion Horsepower Torque (lb-ft) Availability
I6 225 1×1 barrel 145 @ 4,000 rpm 215 @ 2,400 rpm Base
V8 318 1×2 barrel 230 @ 4,400 rpm 340 @ 2,400 rpm Base
V8 383 1×2 barrel 290 @ 4,400 rpm 390 @ 2,800 rpm Base
V8 383 1×4 barrel 330 @ 5,000 rpm 425 @ 3,200 rpm Base
V8 440 1×4 barrel 375 @ 4,600 rpm 480 @ 3,200 rpm R/T
V8 426 2×4 barrel 425 @ 5,000 rpm 490 @ 4,000 rpm R/T

Notable Options:

495: Front Disc Brakes
408: Sure-Grip Differential
456: Power Steering
458: Power Windows
517: Hood-mounted Turn Signals

Performance:

Engine: 426 Hemi
Transmission: 3-speed automatic
0-60: 4.8 seconds
Quarter mile: 13.5 seconds @ 105 mph
80-0 mph panic stop: 274 feet

Source: Motor Trend, November 1967

1969 Dodge Charger #3

1969 Model Year

Styling changes for the 1969 model year were kept to a minimum. After all, if it isn’t broken, why fix it? All Charger models got a center grille divider and restyled taillights. The SE (Special Edition) package was available on the Base and R/T models. Amenities in the package included genuine and vinyl foam-padded front bucket seats, sports-type steering wheel, simulated wood-grained instrument panel, and deep-dish wheel covers. The Charger 500 was a new model introduced for NASCAR homologation. In order to cheat the wind, the Charger 500 featured a flush grille borrowed from the Coronet and a flush-mounted rear window. Power was supplied by either the 440 Magnum or 426 Hemi engine. Another NASCAR-inspired model for 1969 was the Charger Daytona. The Daytona featured an 18-inch nose cone and high wing spoiler mounted to the rear. The 440 Magnum as well as the 426 Hemi were available in the Daytona.

Models: Base, R/T, Charger 500, Daytona

Engines:

Type Cubic Inches Carburetion Horsepower Torque (lb-ft) Availability
I6 225 1×1 barrel 145 @ 4,000 rpm 215 @ 2,400 rpm Base
V8 318 1×2 barrel 230 @ 4,400 rpm 340 @ 2,400 rpm Base
V8 383 1×2 barrel 290 @ 4,400 rpm 390 @ 2,800 rpm Base
V8 383 1×4 barrel 330 @ 5,000 rpm 425 @ 3,200 rpm Base
V8 440 1×4 barrel 375 @ 4,600 rpm 480 @ 3,200 rpm R/T
V8 426 2×4 barrel 425 @ 5,000 rpm 490 @ 4,000 rpm R/T

Notable Options:

A31: High Performance Package
A34: Super Track Pak
H31: Rear Window Defogger
N88: Automatic Speed Control
R13: Astrophonic Radio

Performance:

Engine: 440 Magnum
Transmission: 3-speed automatic
0-60: 6.1 seconds
Quarter mile: 13.9 seconds @ 101.4 mph
Stopping distance (from 60 mph): 143 feet

Source: Motor Trend, January 1969

1970 Dodge Charger #1

1970 Model Year

The 1970 model Charger featured a new chrome loop bumper and R/T models received a reverse-facing door scoop with R/T badging. The Charger 500 was once again available as a package for the Base model. However, it was more or less a dress-up package and not as performance-minded like the 1969 model. The SE (Special Edition) package also returned for 1970. New colors for 1970 include Plum Crazy, Banana, Sublime, Go-Mango, and Hemi Orange. The 440 Six Pack was a new engine option this year and featured three two-barrel carburetors. The tire-smoking 426 Hemi also returned this year and was still rated at 425 horsepower.

Models: Base, Charger 500, R/T

Engines:

Type Cubic Inches Carburetion Horsepower Torque (lb-ft) Availability
I6 225 1×1 barrel 145 @ 4,000 rpm 215 @ 2,400 rpm Base
V8 318 1×2 barrel 230 @ 4,400 rpm 320 @ 2,000 rpm Base
V8 383 1×2 barrel 290 @ 4,400 rpm 390 @ 2,800 rpm Base
V8 383 1×4 barrel 335 @ 5,000 rpm 425 @ 3,200 rpm Base
V8 440 1×4 barrel 375 @ 4,000 rpm 480 @ 3,200 rpm R/T
V8 440 3×2 barrel 390 @ 4,700 rpm 490 @ 3,600 rpm R/T
V8 426 2×4 barrel 425 @ 5,000 rpm 490 @ 4,000 rpm R/T

Notable Options:

G33: Remote Control Outside Left Mirror
J45: Hood Tie-down Pins (R/T)
S83: Rim Blow Steering Wheel
V21: Hood performance paint treatment (R/T)
W21: Rallye Road Wheels

Performance:

Engine: 440 Magnum
Transmission: 3-speed automatic
0-60: 6.4 seconds
Quarter mile: 14.71 seconds @ 96.67 mph

Source: Car Life Magazine

Hagerty Values (#1 Condition, September 2015)

Year Make Model Body Type Engine Value
1968 Dodge Charger Hardtop Coupe 318 V8 2-bbl $39,300
1968 Dodge Charger Hardtop Coupe 383 V8 4-bbl $46,100
1969 Dodge Charger Hardtop Coupe 318 V8 2-bbl $48,000
1969 Dodge Charger Hardtop Coupe 383 V8 2-bbl $57,400
1969 Dodge Charger 500 Hardtop Coupe 426 V8 2×4-bbl $207,000
1969 Dodge Charger R/T Hardtop Coupe 440 V8 4-bbl $72,200
1969 Dodge Charger R/T Hardtop Coupe 426 V8 2×4-bbl $158,000
1969 Dodge Daytona Hardtop Coupe 440 V8 4-bbl $262,000
1969 Dodge Daytona Hardtop Coupe 426 V8 2×4-bbl $777,000
1970 Dodge Charger Hardtop Coupe 318 V8 2-bbl $37,600
1970 Dodge Charger Hardtop Coupe 383 V8 2-bbl $46,000
1970 Dodge Charger Hardtop Coupe 383 V8 4-bbl $49,900
1970 Dodge Charger 500 Hardtop Coupe 318 V8 2-bbl $48,300
1970 Dodge Charger 500 Hardtop Coupe 383 V8 2-bbl $57,900
1970 Dodge Charger 500 Hardtop Coupe 383 V8 4-bbl $62,800
1970 Dodge Charger R/T Hardtop Coupe 440 V8 4-bbl $69,400
1970 Dodge Charger R/T Hardtop Coupe 440 V8 3×2-bbl $86,200
1970 Dodge Charger R/T Hardtop Coupe 426 V8 2×4-bbl $198,000

Concerns:

If you’re looking to buy a second generation Charger, there are some issues to consider when buying.

• Even though the Charger was rustproofed at the factory, over time, rust can sometimes be found in the lower quarter panels and area under the rear window. Check these areas for signs of bodywork or body filler.
• Be wary of cheap restoration parts. Always check the fit and finish of reproduction parts against your originals. Keep in mind that originals parts may fit and look better if reconditioned. This goes for any exterior or interior reproduction parts.
• Before conducting any transaction, it may be best to have the car checked out by someone who’s knowledgeable on the 1968-1970 Charger. You don’t want to end up with a lemon, rust bucket, or a car that’s going to leave you stranded on the side of the road. A professional can also pick out unoriginal parts or a car that’s been potentially cloned.
By doing your homework and a little research, finding a great 1968-1970 Dodge Charger shouldn’t be that complicated. We hope these tips give you an idea of where to start and what to look out for when shopping for a great used second generation Charger.

Sources:
Gunnell, John. Standard Catalog of American Muscle Cars 1960-1972, Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 2006, Print.
Sessler, Peter C., Dodge & Plymouth Muscle Car Red Book, Second Edition, St. Paul, Minnesota: MBI Publishing Company, 2001, Print.
hagerty.com
hemmings.com
musclecarfacts.com

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